Is it possible to be infected with the coronavirus disease through food?

Current evidence on other coronavirus strains shows that while coronaviruses appear to be stable at low and freezing temperatures for a certain period, food hygiene and good food safety practices can prevent their transmission through food.

What is the incubation period of the coronavirus disease?

The incubation period for COVID-19, which is the time between exposure to the virus (becoming infected) and symptom onset, is on average 5-6 days, however can be up to 14 days. During this period, also known as the "pre-symptomatic" period, some infected persons can be contagious. Therefore, transmission from a pre-symptomatic case can occur before symptom onset.

How many people with the coronavirus disease are asymptomatic?

For COVID-19, data to date suggest that 80% of infections are mild or asymptomatic, 15% are severe infection, requiring oxygen and 5% are critical infections, requiring ventilation.

Can the coronavirus disease spread through feces?

The virus that causes COVID-19 has been found in the feces of some patients diagnosed with COVID-19. However, it is unclear whether the virus found in feces may be capable of causing COVID-19. There has not been any confirmed report of the virus spreading from feces to a person.

Do I need to get my pet tested for the coronavirus disease?

No. At this time, routine testing of animals for COVID-19 is not recommended.

What should people at higher risk of serious illness with the coronavirus disease do?

See full answer If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should: Stock up on supplies Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick Limit close contact and wash your hands often Avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor. More information on how to prepare, what to do if you get sick, and how communities and caregivers can support those at higher risk is available on People at Risk for Serious Illness from COVID-19.