Is there a vaccine or treatment for COVID-19?

Not yet. Currently there is no vaccine or specific antiviral medicine to prevent or treat COVID-19. However, there are vaccines and drugs currently under investigation. The National Institutes of Health has estimated that a large clinical trial for a vaccine may be available in 12-15 months.

What is the treatment for COVID-19?

There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19 infection. People infected with COVID-19 are treated with supportive care to help relieve symptoms.

Is there a vaccine under development for the coronavirus?

Experts at the National Institutes of Health and other organizations have begun work to develop a vaccine for this new strain of coronavirus. Scientists are just getting started on this work, but their vaccine development strategy will benefit both from work that has been done on closely related viruses.

What is the difference between coronavirus and COVID-19?

COVID-19 is the name of the disease caused by the new coronavirus that is called SARS-CoV-2, or sometimes just "novel coronavirus".

Is a lost sense of smell a symptom of COVID-19?

Increasing evidence suggests that a lost sense of smell, known medically as anosmia, may be a symptom of COVID-19. This is not surprising, because viral infections are a leading cause of loss of sense of smell, and COVID-19 is a caused by a virus.

Are cancer patients at higher risk from COVID-19 infections?

We are just starting to understand COVID-19 specifically, but other viruses in the corona family often cause more severe illness in people whose immune systems are low, such as cancer patients undergoing treatment.

How long does the virus that causes COVID-19 live on surfaces?

Current guidance indicates that there is: No viable virus after four hours on copper surfaces. No viable virus after 24 hours on cardboard surfaces. No viable virus after four days on plastic and stainless steel. The virus is greatly reduced after 72 hours.

Can pets spread COVID-19?

At this time, there is no evidence that companion animals, including pets, can spread COVID-19 or that they might be a source of infection in the United States.