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Potential benefits of cannabinoids for people with diabetes

It is suggested that patients work with a health care practitioner experienced in recommending CBD or medicinal cannabis so that dosage and delivery methods can be developed and fine-tuned on an individual basis. At the same time, educated and aware patients can be their own highly informed health consultants (see p.

75 for information about the subjective-intuitive approach to using cannabis-based medicines). CBD products with a ratio of 20:1 or higher are recommended and administered as drops, capsules, or edibles. For all orally administered medicines, refer to the dosage tables on pp. 61–63 for guidelines on CBD dosage by body weight.

Always start with the micro dose to test sensitivity and go up as needed within the dosing range before going to the next, until symptoms subside. The standard dose is recommended to treat diabetes. Vaporized or smoked cannabis is recommended for relief of immediate symptoms, such as neuropathic pain or “restless legs syndrome.”

It is also useful for sleep issues. Sublingual sprays or tinctures taken as liquid drops take effect quickly and last longer than inhaled products. More information about various forms of delivery (e.g., sublingual, oral, inhaled) for cannabinoid-based medication can be found starting on p. 38. When neuropathic pain is present, topical products can be applied. These can be made using CBD-dominant cannabis or other strains.

Lastly

Topicals affect the cells near application and through several layers of tissue but do not cross the blood-brain barrier and are, therefore, not psychoactive. These may be available as oils, ointments, salves, or other forms, with varying ratios of CBD and THC (a ratio of 1:1 is often recommended as ideal for skin application). The skin has the highest amount and concentration of CB2 receptors in the body.

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