What cardiovascular preconditions put people at increased risk for serious complications from the coronavirus disease?

Serious heart conditions, including heart failure, coronary artery disease, congenital heart disease, cardiomyopathies, and pulmonary hypertension, may put people at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

What should people at higher risk of serious illness with the coronavirus disease do?

See full answer If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should: Stock up on supplies Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick Limit close contact and wash your hands often Avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor. More information on how to prepare, what to do if you get sick, and how communities and caregivers can support those at higher risk is available on People at Risk for Serious Illness from COVID-19.

Who is at risk for severe disease from the coronavirus disease?

See full answer The available data are currently insufficient to clearly identify risk factors for severe clinical outcomes. Based on limited data that are available for COVID-19 patients, and data from related coronaviruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and MERS-CoV, people who may be at risk for more severe outcomes include older adults and persons who have certain underlying chronic medical conditions. Those underlying chronic conditions include chronic lung disease, moderate to severe asthma, cardiac disease with complications, diabetes, or immunocompromising conditions. See also Interim Clinical Guidance for Management of Patients with Confirmed Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Information for Healthcare Professionals: COVID-19 and Underlying Conditions.

What is considered a close contact for infection of the coronavirus disease?

Based on our current knowledge, a close contact is someone who was within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 30 minutes starting from 48 hours before illness onset

Are pregnant women at higher risk for the coronavirus disease?

We do not currently know if pregnant women have a greater chance of getting sick from COVID-19 than the general public nor whether they are more likely to have serious illness as a result. Pregnant women experience changes in their bodies that may increase their risk of some infections. With viruses from the same family as COVID-19, and other viral respiratory infections, such as influenza, women have had a higher risk of developing severe illness. It is always important for pregnant women to protect themselves from illnesses.

What is the incubation period of the coronavirus disease?

The incubation period for COVID-19, which is the time between exposure to the virus (becoming infected) and symptom onset, is on average 5-6 days, however can be up to 14 days. During this period, also known as the "pre-symptomatic" period, some infected persons can be contagious. Therefore, transmission from a pre-symptomatic case can occur before symptom onset.

What are signs and symptoms of the coronavirus disease?

Signs and symptoms include respiratory symptoms and include fever, cough and shortness of breath. In more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome and sometimes death. Standard recommendations to prevent the spread of COVID-19 include frequent cleaning of hands using alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water; covering the nose and mouth with a flexed elbow or disposable tissue when coughing and sneezing; and avoiding close contact with anyone that has a fever and cough.

Are people with disabilities at higher risk of contracting the coronavirus disease?

See full answer Most people with disabilities are not inherently at higher risk for becoming infected with or having severe illness from COVID-19. Some people with physical limitations or other disabilities might be at a higher risk of infection because of their underlying medical condition. People with certain disabilities might experience higher rates of chronic health conditions that put them at higher risk of serious illness and poorer outcomes from COVID-19. Adults with disabilities are three times more likely to have heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or cancer than adults without disabilities. You should talk with your healthcare provider if you have a question about your health or how your health condition is being managed.